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Vocal Recording Basics Part 3: Frequency Response and Microphones  In Vocal Recording Basics Part 2, I mentioned the use of specific techniques to make the most of audio recording a home or project studio. Those techniques go the furthest in creating a clean sounding recording, and using the right tools takes things just a step further. Few distinguishing characteristics of microphones matter aside from its frequency response. Frequency response describes...
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Vocal Recording Basics Part 2: Signal-to-Noise (SNR) As mentioned in Vocal Recording Basics Part 1, recording technique trumps equipment. The primary tenet of a good, clean-sounding recording comes from a high signal-to-noise ratio. This is the biggest tell for a poor recording, and yet it’s incredibly easy to fix.  Signal-to-noise is the difference between the desired recorded material (e.g., your voice) to the noise level (electrical noise, room echo, noisy...
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Vocal Recording Basics Part 1: Where to Start Before even discussing equipment or techniques, we have to start with our end goal. Audio equipment manufacturers, bloggers, and recording magazines love selling you things you don’t need. There are plenty of honest people sharing quality recommendations, but others prey on your lack of information to boost their profit margin. The most expensive microphone sounds completely awful when addressed from ten feet...
One of our favorite tools for vocal postproduction is the Waves Vocal Rider plug-in. We typically don’t recommend third-party plug-ins, but this particular plug-in is a workhorse and performs excellently for spoken and sung vocals. Its simple interface makes it easy to use and fits in with our ethos for creating great audio in the shortest amount of time.  Overview The Waves Vocal Rider plug-in mimics someone moving fader moving...
This is a simple tutorial on how to add the perfect amount of compression for speech, dialogue and spoken vocals in Logic Pro X. It only takes a few clicks to get excellent results, thanks to Logic’s excellent compressor plug-in that comes standard with the program.  The Logic Pro X default compressor has several emulation algorithms, our favorite of which is the optical compressor (referred to as “Opto” in the...
In 2019, the idea of outsourcing audio production seems like a ludicrous idea for all but giant companies with enormous budgets. At Finewav, we predict that media production will see major growth in the coming decade as more people and companies from around the world enter the content creation marketplace.  Everyone from eBay sellers to real estate agents will likely make use of audio in the form of podcasts, videos,...
In our last post, we discussed the best practices for using reverb in audio production. This time, we’ll outline how to create auxiliary (“aux”) sends and returns in Apple Logic Pro X. This tool not only works for reverb, but other effects like chorusing, flanging, pitch shifting, and parallel compression. Even though we’ll be using Logic Pro X, the same concept applies to other DAWs and can be done quite...
Optimizing Sound for Reverb The terms “wet” and “dry” are used in audio to denote a sound with a reverberant (“wet”) sound or a sound relatively free of reverberation (“dry”). The use of effects like reverb are powerful tools for storytelling and conveying a sense of time and place through audio. In literal terms, reverb creates a sense of space by mimicking acoustic reflections, or sound waves bouncing off surfaces....
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